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Dublin, OH, 43017
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Healthy Roster provides patient engagement, care coordination, telemedicine and outreach tools for Sports Medicine, Orthopedics and other medical specialties. We enable patients to communicate with providers, reducing communication gaps, phone tag, and readmissions. Use with Home Health & SNF’s to manage CJR and Cardiac bundled payments.

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Sports Medicine Outreach and Engagement Platform

 

OhioHealth CEO Joins Board of Directors

Healthy Roster

Healthy Roster Adds OhioHealth's Dave Blom to Board of Directors

Healthy Roster Adds Blom to Help Guide Accelerated Growth

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COLUMBUS, Ohio, April 10, 2018 – David P. Blom, OhioHealth’s president and CEO has joined the Board of Directors of Healthy Roster Inc., a Columbus-based company that develops and provides virtual athletic training applications.  Blom leads the not-for-profit, faith-based, healthcare system of 28,000 physicians, associates and volunteers and more than $2 billion in net revenue.

“Dave is a leader in the healthcare industry and he understands how our technology can positively impact patient engagement and outcomes,” said Nathan Heerdt, CEO, Healthy Roster. "Dave’s experience will be invaluable to Healthy Roster as we scale our product and grow our customer base."

More than 100 orthopedic groups across 37 states have adopted Healthy Roster's engagement platform. Originally designed to improve sports medicine outreach efforts, Healthy Roster has experienced rapid growth by expanding into other areas leveraging its HIPAA-compliant chat and telemedicine features.

“Healthy Roster provides an innovative approach through technology and telemedicine that effectively coordinates patient care, especially in the area of sports medicine,” said Blom. “I’m honored to have the opportunity to provide insight as they bring this product to more clinicians and patients.”

“We’re extremely fortunate to have someone with such incredible credentials be a part of this crucial growth period in our company,” said fellow board member and president Dan Fronczak.

All Star Athletic Trainer: Dani Tucker

Healthy Roster

Currently an Athletic Trainer for North Central High School in Indianapolis, Dani Tucker has been an influential part of Methodist Sports Medicine’s coverage of North Central High School for years. Dani has a Bachelor of Arts in Athletic Training from Anderson University in Anderson, Indiana.

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In 2014, Dani was part of the North Central High School athletic program that was awarded the Safe Sports School Award by the National Athletic Trainers Association - the first in the Indianapolis area to do so. The award recognizes secondary schools that take crucial steps to keep their athletes free from injuries.

Healthy Roster Director of Customer Success Rob Mottice is impressed with Dani and North Central High School’s adoption of the Healthy Roster platform:

"Since day 1 of starting with Healthy Roster in the late summer of 2017, Dani and fellow AT Miho Sayles have been highly engaged with all that Healthy Roster has to offer for over 700 athletes at her school in Indiana. Between the two, they have logged almost 200 injuries, over 2,000 treatments and over 130 referrals. Parent adoption at their school is approaching 50% in the first few months of using Healthy Roster.

To hear from Dani herself about her experiences in the athletic training field, check out her responses below:

Why did you become an Athletic Trainer?

I grew up in a small town and played 3 sports for my school where we did not have access to an athletic trainer. Following several injuries in high school and spending time with an athletic trainer to rehab those injuries I found a passion for sports medicine.

Without sharing any PHI of course, what is your most memorable moment as an Athletic Trainer?

Every athlete who I have had the pleasure of helping come back from a significant injury is very memorable. Watching them return to their sport & be successful is the greatest reward!

What advice would you give others, either in the profession or considering becoming an Athletic Trainer?

For those considering becoming an Athletic Trainer I would HIGHLY recommend shadowing one for some time. I think a lot of kids like the thought of being involved in sports with our profession but also don’t understand the time commitment it takes.

What do you feel people outside of your profession should know about Athletic Trainers?

We are not personal trainers. We are involved in the Sports Medicine side of keeping athletes healthy, safe & getting them back on the field as quick & safe as possible.

What is the key to being successful in Athletic Training?

Continue to learn, know the latest research/techniques being used & always stand up for yourself.

All Star Athletic Trainer: Danielle Smith

Healthy Roster

 Danielle Smith, Head Athletic Trainer, Maryknoll School

Danielle Smith, Head Athletic Trainer, Maryknoll School

As the Head Athletic Trainer at Maryknoll School, a private Catholic K-12 school in Honolulu, Hawaii, Danielle Smith definitely keeps busy providing AT services to students involved in over 20 sports and 100 teams competing in three leagues. She earned her Master of Science in 2013 from the University of Hawaii at Manoa and her Bachelor of Science in 2011 from San Diego Christian College.

Danielle has received many awards and recognitions throughout her career, including the Lindsey McLean Memorial Scholarship from the National Athletic Trainers’ Association in 2012, the Jerry Lloyd Memorial Scholarship from the Far West Athletic Trainers’ Association in 2012 and was both Valedictorian and Outstanding Kinesiology Student from San Diego Christian College in 2011.

Healthy Roster Director of Customer Success Rob Mottice is consistently impressed with Danielle’s strong use of the Healthy Roster platform:

“Danielle is the lead Athletic Trainer at Hawaii's Maryknoll School and has been one of our leading Athletic Trainers in terms of quality/quantity of entries. She has logged over 2,000 treatments and almost 400 injuries for her students. She has been quick to learn and master the latest features and was one of Healthy Roster's first "super-users.”

To hear from Danielle about her experiences in the athletic training field, check out her responses below:
 

Why did you become an Athletic Trainer?

I had a bad soccer injury when I was 11 years old that resulted in surgery, 6 months on crutches, and 1 year of physical therapy before I was allowed to run or jump again. While it was definitely a tough time, I remember there was a great sports medicine team of Physical Therapists and Doctors who helped me get back into playing soccer, a sport that I still participate in today. When I entered college, I knew I wanted to do something in Sports Medicine to help others with their injuries but wasn’t sure exactly what that would look like. I spent some time shadowing in a PT Clinic, a Doctor’s Office, and in the Athletic Training Room at my college. By the end of my Junior year, I knew I wanted to go to graduate school for Athletic Training.

Without sharing any PHI of course, what is your most memorable moment as an Athletic Trainer?

My first weekend at my first full-time job, I had to call EMS twice in a span of two hours for a couple pretty gnarly injuries—one of them being a tibial plateu fracture (see attachment for photo of X-ray).

What advice would you give others, either in the profession or considering becoming an Athletic Trainer?

For those considering becoming an Athletic Trainer, make sure you spend time shadowing someone in the field enough that you understand what you’re getting into before you commit. It’s a very rewarding job but it does come with some unique challenges. For those in the profession: when the going gets tough, remember that we grow stronger through the struggle. It’s not just muscles that grow stronger with resistance; don’t let your spirit atrophy.

What do you feel people outside of your profession should know about Athletic Trainers

Athletic Trainers are there to worry about the sports injuries so coaches & parents don’t have to. They are sports medicine professionals trained to respond quickly in emergency situations who also are skilled athletic injury prevention, evaluation, & rehabilitation. If your school doesn’t have an Athletic Trainer on-staff, ask your administration: “Why not?"

What is the key to being successful in Athletic Training?

Always remember that you’re treating a person, not just an injury.

All-Star Athletic Trainer: Ashley Dutcher

Healthy Roster

 Ashley Dutcher, Lead Athletic Trainer, Memorial Hospital

Ashley Dutcher, Lead Athletic Trainer, Memorial Hospital

Currently the Lead Athletic Trainer for Memorial Hospital, Ashley Dutcher has had an influential role with all of Memorial’s partner schools for many years, launching and implementing Memorial’s sports medicine services and keeping countless athletes safe throughout Ohio. Ashley has a Master of Science from Ohio University and a Bachelor of Arts in Athletic Training from Capital University.

Throughout her career, Ashley has received multiple recognitions, including the 2010 Capital Athletic Training Award, and she was a 2014 Ohio Hospital Association Albert Dyckes Health Care Worker of the Year Nominee. When she’s not working, she enjoys the outdoors, fishing, watching football and baking.

Healthy Roster Director of Customer Success Rob Mottice is grateful for Ashley’s athletic training knowledge and in-depth understanding of our platform:

“Ashley has been an active user of Healthy Roster since day 1, and has pushed us to improve with valuable constructive feedback. She has given us a great understanding the daily life of an athletic trainer, helping us create a better experience for those who rely on Healthy Roster on a daily basis. She continually supports her AT staff and their Healthy Roster training while managing hundreds of athletes at her own school. She has been a very valuable partner!”

To hear from Ashley herself about her experiences in the athletic training field, check out her responses below:

Why did you become an Athletic Trainer?

I became a student aide my sophomore year of high school and couldn't get enough of the profession from there. I love the atmosphere, the involvement in health care, and the joys of athletic training.

Without sharing any PHI of course, what is your most memorable moment as an Athletic Trainer?

The biggest wins tend to stick in your mind, regarding both games and athletes. I worked a football game a few months ago that I will absolutely never forget. Those first few "big injuries" as an independent AT also stick as well. Mostly I remember the gratitude of so many athletes, college and high school, for supporting them and helping them to succeed. I have 2 "first homerun" softballs on my desk, one collegiate and one high school, from kids who suffered through injuries and found success on the field. Those two balls are more important to me than my two conference championship rings!

What advice would you give others, either in the profession or considering becoming an Athletic Trainer?

Go with your gut instincts. This profession is fueled by various passions: for sport, for health, for success. Each and every AT I know genuinely LOVES athletic training. I speak to a lot of high school kids regarding future goals and professions and I tell them all, "you will know if this is the field for you" and if you love it, stick with it. It's one of the most rewarding fields you will ever experience.

What do you feel people outside of your profession should know about Athletic Trainers?

We do a lot more than distribute water at football games and show people how to work out! We have invested numerous years, and many hours of continuing education, on our professional knowledge and we are much more than what you see on TV.

What is the key to being successful in Athletic Training?

Staying fresh, staying involved, and enjoying your setting, whether its high school outreach, collegiate, professional, industrial or clinical.