Contact Us

Thank you for visiting our website. If you'd like a demo of Healthy Roster, please fill out the form below and we'll follow up with you as quickly as possible!

Name *
Name

20 North Street
Dublin, OH, 43017
United States

Healthy Roster provides patient engagement, care coordination, telemedicine and outreach tools for Sports Medicine, Orthopedics and other medical specialties. We enable patients to communicate with providers, reducing communication gaps, phone tag, and readmissions. Use with Home Health & SNF’s to manage CJR and Cardiac bundled payments.

Blog

Sports Medicine Outreach and Engagement Platform

 

Let's Talk: Increasing Coach and Athletic Trainer Communication

Healthy Roster

pexels-photo-1376863.jpg

Let’s Talk:

Increasing Coach and Athletic Trainer Communication

Last week, our team member, Amelia, had a great conversation with Shauna, a long-time customer.

Shauna had just had a team meeting where they’d discussed an article studying whether communication between sports medicine providers and coaches correlates to the number and duration of athlete injuries, and it had made her think about how much Healthy Roster’s communication features had helped her sports medicine staff communicate better with their school’s coaches.

The results of the study were not surprising - “Teams with high internal communication quality had lower injury rates and higher player availability than teams with low communication quality.” Additionally, the study found that when an organization had frequent miscommunications and members felt out of the loop or not valued, the added stress led to a potential for a higher injury rate.

This conversation got our team thinking - why are those miscommunications occurring and how can Healthy Roster be used to improve communication between ATs and coaches?

Most sports medicine providers communicate via text because they don’t have an effective communication platform, and even those that do, often find it’s not HIPAA compliant (which is critical when including clinicians into a conversation about an athlete’s health).

Plus, in most environments, the athlete to athletic trainer ratio is typically quite high, meaning that the athletic trainer is so busy treating athletes, they might not have time to communicate with every coach about every athlete. Along with this kind of time constraint, athletic trainers have historically reported feeling pressure from coaches to return athletes to play sooner than a medical professional feels comfortable because of the athlete’s value on the field.

Coaches might have specific knowledge about an athlete’s mental and physical health, but without a simple and secure method to inform sports medicine providers about these insights, the athletic trainers and team physicians might be in the dark about this potentially crucial information.

Healthy Roster was built to help stop these miscommunications and allow everyone devoted to keeping athletes safe up-to-date and in-the-loop about anything related to the athlete’s health.

By providing a platform for athletic trainers, coaches, team physicians, caregivers and athletes to all effectively, efficiently and securely communicate, we’ve created a way for athletic trainers to disseminate information without adding more hours to their workday and for coaches to be able to understand their crucial role in helping one of their athletes return to play safely and quickly.

Whether it’s through our interactive injury timeline, our secure messaging feature, or our telemedicine capabilities, Healthy Roster is changing the way sports medicine professionals and coaches communicate and helping to decrease the number and duration of injuries.

Do you want to learn more about how you can increase communication and improve relationships between coaches and sports medicine professionals? Schedule a demo with one of our team members today!

Introducing the Redesigned Healthy Roster Dashboard

Healthy Roster

Screen Shot 2019-05-22 at 11.14.31 AM.png

Dashboard Redesign

Continued improvements at Healthy Roster brings Spring Cleaning to our system with a newly redesigned web dashboard.

Plus, stay tuned in the next few weeks for a major new feature we’ll be launching at the NATA Convention in June!

Check out what you’ll see in the new design:

Log In Screen

Log In Screen

Log In Screen


Main Dashboard

Main Dashboard

Main Dashboard


Athlete Profile

Athlete Profile

Athlete Profile


Incident Reports

Edit Incident Report

Edit Incident Report

Looking for Healthy Roster tutorials? Visit our Training Camp here: https://hrtraining.camp/

Book Recommendations for Athletic Trainers

Healthy Roster

books-indoors-pages-45717.jpg

Take A Book Break

Six Book Recommendations for Athletic Trainers

If there’s one thing that all athletic trainers have, it’s free time… Ok, maybe you could detect a bit of sarcasm there. In fact, with the long hours, high expectations, and pressures from coaches, parents, and administrators, ATs have to manage a variety of stresses every day. In order to avoid burnout and stay on top of your mental health, it’s important that you take advantage of what free time you do have to rest, recharge, and engage your mind.

One great way to do so is by reading. More than just a fun way to pass the time, reading has been shown to sharpen your mind, boost your mental health, and even increase your tolerance for uncertainty. And while you might not imagine that the “Athletic Training” section occupies that large of a chunk of the Dewey Decimal system, there are countless books that can help you stay up to date in your field and motivated in your career. From practical information to athletic inspiration, here are six books to pick up during your off-hours recommended by ATs on Twitter!

Quick Questions

Quick Questions

The “Quick Questions” Series, edited by Eric L. Sauers

From ankle sprains to heat-related illnesses to concussions, each volume of this series offers brief, yet comprehensive answers to a variety of frequently asked clinical questions surrounding a particular type of athletic injury. The series, which is co-published by Slack Incorporated and NATA, sources from experts in each field who back up their responses with the current research. Written in a conversational tone and covering a cavalcade of questions within each topic, these volumes make for the perfect reference to keep on hand at your facility or to peruse at home to stay up to date on the latest advancements.

“The Brave Athlete,” by Simon Marshall, Ph.D., and Lesley Paterson

The Brave Athlete

The Brave Athlete

The world of athletic mindset literature revolves around the idea of optimization. How can you enhance your mental toughness in order to push yourself to your greatest potential? The solutions these books provide often follow a sort of no-nonsense approach to improvement: accept responsibility, stop making excuses, and put in the work. While there’s nothing wrong with this simple philosophy, the problem is that the mental challenges that athletes — especially young athletes — face in today’s world are much more varied and complex than just how can I be better? Luckily, “The Brave Athlete” fills in the gaps. Written by sports psychology expert Dr. Simon Marshall and world-champion triathlete and coach Lesley Paterson, the book lays out mental skills for athletes plagued by questions such as “other athletes seem tougher and happier than me,” “I don’t cope well with injury,” and “I don’t handle pressure well.” Especially if you work with college or youth athletes, this is ideal reading to provide you with the mental health tools you need to assist your patients.

A Still Quiet Place for Athletes

A Still Quiet Place for Athletes

“A Still Quiet Place For Athletes,” by Amy Saltzman, M.D.

Given the fast-paced and frenetic nature of 21st-century society, it’s no wonder that mindfulness has exploded in popularity in recent years, offering individuals from all walks of life the opportunity to take a breath, recharge, and improve their stress management. The benefits of the practice extend far beyond decreased anxiety, however. The world’s best athletes have long-understood that being able to be still and observe your thoughts and physical sensations can help you achieve the ideal mindset for success. That’s what makes this workbook from holistic physician and longtime athlete Amy Saltzman such an essential addition to the library of any athlete or athletic trainer. By guiding them into that “still, quiet place,” Saltzman helps athletes better engage with their physical training, pain, injury, and fatigue. So whether you’re looking to help your patients or improve your own mental skill set, go ahead and add this one to your wishlist!

Nancy Clark’s Sports Nutrition Guidebook

Nancy Clark’s Sports Nutrition Guidebook

“Nancy Clark’s Sports Nutrition Guidebook,” by Nancy Clark, M.S., R.D.

As we’ve covered before, a nutritious diet is an essential element of any healthy athlete’s routine. And while every athlete should ideally have access to a sports dietician, in reality that’s often not the case, so it’s important for athletic trainers to have some basic knowledge regarding proper nutrition. The sheer abundance of books on sports nutrition is overwhelming, so to make things easy, we’ll recommend just this one, from renowned sports dietician (and team nutritionist for the Boston Red Sox) Nancy Clark. Offering basic concepts, recommendations, and meal plans for athletes of all levels and types, Clark can help you understand how to modify your patients’ diet in order to improve their performance, manage their stress, and increase their energy. Plus, ATs will be happy to see how meticulously researched and cited the volume is, allowing you to easily access the studies she drew from in order to review her conclusions yourself.

Eleven Seconds

Eleven Seconds

“Eleven Seconds,” by Travis Roy

Absent the scientific education and expertise of the other titles on this list, “Eleven Seconds” offers another key element of career improvement: inspiration. The haunting title refers to the entire timespan of Travis Roy’s collegiate hockey career. Having dreamt throughout his childhood of playing hockey for Boston University, Roy finally got his chance in October of 1995, but 11 seconds into his first shift, he plunged headfirst into the boards, cracked his fourth vertebra, and became paralyzed from the neck down. What followed was a long, long road of rehabilitation, as Roy struggled to make sense of his new life — and wondered if it was even worth living. Through perseverance, humor, and a whole lot of introspection, Travis manages to find meaning in the road ahead and to learn to still love sports even though he’ll never play them again. Being familiar with the pain and anxiety that often accompanies the recovery process, ATs will draw inspiration and energy from Travis’s impossible story.

What Made Maddy Run

What Made Maddy Run

HEALTHY ROSTER’S PICK: “What Made Maddy Run,” by Kate Fagan

Mental health is quickly becoming one of the most important topics in sports and in education. Our Chief Technology Officer, Shawn Price, recently read What Made Maddy Run, and he recommends it to anyone invested in the health and wellbeing of student-athletes nationwide:

“We are in the midst of a mental health crisis and there’s no place that’s more clear than on college campuses. Sports can be tremendously helpful when growing a young athlete’s sense of self, but when that identity is challenged at the college level it has the potential to compound all of the normal mental health issues the college experience can trigger. Mental Health should be at the forefront of anyone’s mind who regularly interacts with athletes. “What Made Maddy Run” really brings that point home by telling the real life story of an all-American girl who struggles with, and ultimately loses, that battle.” - Shawn Price

Have any titles to add to the list? Let us know by commenting below or tweeting us @HealthyRoster!

Athletic Trainer Twitter Roundup: #NATM2019

Healthy Roster

natm_atsare_healthcare.jpg

AT Twitter Roundup

National Athletic Training Month 2019

Has your bracket been busted past recovery? Need something to cheer you up? Well, we have just the thing! In addition to being the month of Madness, March was National Athletic Training Month, which was celebrated this year with the slogan “ATs Are Health Care.” As we all know, ATs are also quite Twitter savvy, so as a final hurrah, we’re rounding up some of the most insightful, heartfelt, and hilarious #NATM2019 tweets from the past few weeks. Retweet away!

Throughout the month, we remembered that ATs Are Health Care across a variety of settings, from the military:

…to the ballet:

…to NASA.

It was a month of recognition, with athletes recognizing the athletic trainers that support them:

…ATs recognizing the athletes that make their job so rewarding:

… and even lawmakers recognizing the importance of the AT profession:

We took notice of the ATs behind the scenes at our favorite March sporting event:

… and learned that some ATs are quite literally watching over us from above:

Some ATs joked about the hectic calendars that come with each new season:

… while others made use of what free time they do have to continue their lifelong learning:

We highlighted key issues within the community, such as the importance of licensure:

… while reminding businesses around the globe that quality athletic training is an investment worth making:

ATs spread the word by mapping their anatomy:

… celebrating the unsung heroes:

… and exerting an impressive amount of willpower:

Our favorite plastic AT managed to highlight two important celebrations in a single tweet!

And finally, we took the time to say thank you to the athletic trainers that make our lives safe and better every day:

WHAT WERE YOUR FAVORITE ATHLETIC TRAINING TWEETS FROM #NATM2019 ? LET US KNOW IN THE COMMENTS BELOW AND TAG US @HEALTHYROSTER ON TWITTER!

What Athletic Trainers Should Know About Esports

Healthy Roster

action-blur-close-up-735911.jpg

Game On(line)

What Athletic Trainers Should Know About Esports

Athletic trainers are accustomed to seeing the same groups of athletes coming through their facilities every season: football players in the fall, wrestlers in the winter, softball players in the spring. There’s a rhythm to this cycle, each sport arriving with its own set of injuries and ailments to contend with. But now, a new sport is shaking up that rhythm, and its equipment consists of a console, a controller and a computer.

That’s right, esports is the latest competitive activity taking the world by storm. Though the stereotypical image of a hardcore gamer is someone holed up in a dark room and sitting stagnant in front of a screen all day, don’t be mistaken — these are called e-sports for a reason. And as with any other sport, esports requires ATs and other medical professionals to work with the athletes to ensure they’re staying on top of their physical and mental health. With esports rising in popularity and with more and more schools adding varsity esports programs, it’s important for ATs to understand the sport and the risks these athletes face.

What is esports?

Esports, as a whole, describes the world of competitive, organized video games. The games themselves vary, with teams competing in leagues dedicated to titles such as “League of Legends,” “Overwatch,” “Hearthstone,” “Fortnite,” and “CS:GO.” Though some leagues host live events and some competitions are even broadcast on television, the majority of esports fans tune in via streaming services such as Twitch. This is where most of the sport’s following has grown — and quite the following it is.

Esports Competition

Esports Competition

According to research firm Newzoo, the international esports audience will reach 453.8 million this year, generating revenues of $1.1 billion. With that much money at stake, a growing number of esports teams are now fully or partially owned by traditional sports team owners such as Robert Kraft and Stan Kroenke. Those sorts of investors are able to provide esports programs with the same level of medical staff as other professional athletes.

But the popularity extends beyond the professional realm as well. Varsity scholarships have been available to college esports athletes since 2014, and today, the National Association of Collegiate Esports consists of more than 135 member schools and over 3,000 student athletes. There is even discussion about making esports an Olympic event. Much more than just “gaming,” esports is a legitimate sport that requires intense levels of training and conditioning. Without the assistance of athletic trainers, esports athletes can succumb to myriad injuries, both physical and mental.

Common Physical Injuries

When you watch esports, you might not consider it a very physical activity. It involves a lot of sitting, clicking a controller, and staring at a bright screen. But these repeated motions actually put esports athletes at risk for very particular injuries, the most common of which is Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, caused by intense repetitive movements of the fingers. Young gamers that notice their hands beginning to tingle or go numb tend to ignore it, thinking that it will heal on its own. But with time, use of their hand can grow more difficult, and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome can actually end their careers. Education and preventative care are essential to catching injuries like this before they affect one’s future.

Other common areas of concern are the elbows, knees, feet, and neck, all of which are subject to repetitive motion or stress injuries, or even tendinitis. Additionally, medical professionals should work with esports athletes to monitor their eye health, as prolonged periods of staring at a screen can cause significant fatigue and strain, and can even affect their hand-eye coordination — an essential element in their athletic repertoire.

Common Mental Concerns

When working with any athlete, it’s important to focus on both their body and their mind. This is especially true with esports athletes, as their intense training regimen (12-16 hours of gaming a day) tends to keep them inside. In addition to the burnout that can be caused by looking at a screen for that long, their schedule often forces them to give up time with friends and family, and unlike other sports, they don’t enjoy a built-in off-season. Job security is also a concern, as the competitive nature of the burgeoning sport means there is always someone gunning for a player’s job, ready to take it if they don’t succeed. Taking all of this into consideration, it’s no surprise that mental health issues such as depression and anxiety are pervasive throughout the community.

Another item of concern is drug abuse. In the past, esports athletes have admitted to using Adderall during a competition to enhance their performance, as the ADHD medication can help them stay energized and focused. Though there is little evidence that Adderall actually gives players an extra advantage, abusing any prescription medication is dangerous, especially an amphetamine like Adderall that, in addition to increasing one’s heart rate and blood pressure, can be incredibly addictive.

One thing we have tried to do is create a support network for them to become more healthy overall, just like any other athlete. The esports team has voluntary team lifting with our Strength & Conditioning coaches, as well as the option to receive individual nutrition counseling…Every so often we have small groups talks on topics such as posture, hand/forearm injury prevention, and physical activity.
— David Jameyson, MS, AT, ATC (Ashland University)

Healthy Habits

So what should the relationship between an esports athlete and an athletic trainer look like? In addition to providing prevention, examination, diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation for the conditions listed above, ATs — along with coaches and other medical professionals — should work with esports athletes to establish proper nutrition and general fitness routines.

We talked to David Jameyson, MS, AT, ATC, at Ashland University (which houses one of the country’s top esports programs and uses Healthy Roster for injury documentation and communication) about his experiences providing athletic training services to esports athletes:

Ashland University Esports

Ashland University Esports

“One thing we have tried to do is create a support network for them to become more healthy overall, just like any other athlete,” Jameyson said. “The esports team has voluntary team lifting with our Strength & Conditioning coaches, as well as the option to receive individual nutrition counseling…Every so often we have small groups talks on topics such as posture, hand/forearm injury prevention, and physical activity.”

Gaming itself is not physically exhausting, but because of their intense commitment to training, many esports athletes neglect to eat healthily, develop a regular sleep cycle, or get enough physical exercise. This sedentary lifestyle that esports has a tendency to breed can lead to mental burnout. Even more seriously, at least six high-profile esports players have suffered spontaneous pneumothorax (collapsed lung), though there has been no direct indication of causation.

Keep in mind that esports is still young, as is the knowledge of how to treat these athletes. New advancements are being made every day. For instance, in 2017, a 2,000-square-foot esports training center opened in Thousand Oaks, California, with state-of-the-art technology designed specifically to perfect gamers’ physical and cognitive skills. And Dr. Levi Harrison, a Los Angeles-based orthopedic surgeon has established the country’s first esports-focused practice, helping to develop specific exercises and ergonomic hand positions for athletes based on what sort of controller they use. There is a lot of ground to cover, so as with any field, it’s important for ATs to stay up-to-date on the latest advancements, continuing their education so they can provide the best possible care.